Margaret Kavanagh
[mashshare]

This Woman Rocked Her World with Crochet

stones with crochet

Crocheted stones? Yep. Let us explain…


Quite a few years ago, I found a beautiful, smooth, rounded stone on the beach. Inspiration hit, and I decided to try my hand at crocheting around that small stone.
I turned it into a pendant, and, since then, I’ve crocheted around dozens of stones, small and large. One of my new passions is finding larger stones to crochet around and use for home décor. Rock hunting can be a fun family outing.
Choosing the right threads and yarns to compliment your style can be an interesting challenge. Using the rocks throughout your home can create statement décor, memory keepers, and conversation starters.

Rock Hunting

There are actually quite a few rules about what type and where you can collect stones from. Do a quick “rockhounding in my area” search on the internet to ensure you're collecting legally. There are rock quarries that you can get permits for, and there are public beaches and wilderness areas that restrict what you can collect and how many pounds of it. It’s usually quite a lot, but just to be safe, do a quick search before you head out.

river rocks

Smooth, flat, river rocks are what the author used, but you can use any rock that suits you.


Look for stones that have smooth surfaces and are more-or-less uniform in shape. It’s much easier to crochet around a stone that is completely round or oval. It helps to have a stone that has flat and rounded surfaces when you're starting out. As you become more adventurous and advanced in your rock-crocheting, you can experiment with all different shapes. However, ideally, smooth is best.
My family and I often collect stones along the Oregon Coast. When I'm searching for stones specifically to crochet around, I don’t really pay attention to the stone's type. I care more about shape and texture. If I’m lucky, I may find an agate, jasper or other semi-precious stone that is the right shape. More often than not, I’m just getting smooth, grey river rocks.

Thread Choice

There are so many choices for crocheting around stones. There are also no rules! Choose whichever colors, thread/yarn sizes, and fibers you prefer.
I accomplished the look in my photos by using size-20 crochet thread. It’s a challenge to work with, but the results are always beautiful. I have also used size-10 and size-3 crochet threads.

crochet stones

The size and color thread or yarn you choose determines your finished look as much as the rock you started with.


If you are just starting out using thread, I’d recommend starting with size 3 and work your way down to the thinner threads and smaller hooks. My favorite threads are Lizbeth Thread (20, 10, 3 or metallic) from Handy Hands Tatting. They have an amazing collection of solid, variegated, twirled, and metallic colors. The quality is excellent.
As a beginner, go through your stash and find anything that you love and play around with it. You can even experiment with finer, lace weight yarns to see if it will give you the effect you are looking for.

Crocheting

To start crocheting, choose a hook that will give you tight stitches and just start. All of my stones are crocheted “freestyle.” I don’t follow any patterns. I think it helps that I’ve crocheted many doilies and patterns in the round.
If it’s your first time, I’d recommend finding a doily pattern that you love. Choose a rock that is fairly round and flat. Crochet the pattern until the doily just barely reaches over the edges of the stone. Once you’ve hit this point, you need to stop increasing and start decreasing the number of stitches around.

crocheted rocks

Your design choices are endless, from color to stitches, to yarn or thread.


Eventually, you’ll have to put the crocheted piece on the stone and continue crocheting holding both. This is hard and can lead to hand cramps, but don’t give up. Continue to decrease your rounds, making sure to pull the crocheted piece tightly around the rock while you work.
You don’t want your crochet to be loose on the rock. It should be tight and pretty much immobile when you complete the crocheting. Finally, tie off and weave in your ends.

Rocks in Your Home

Crocheted rocks make beautiful displays in your home. You can crochet in seasonal colors and change your displays for each season or holiday. You can use the accent colors of your home and keep the rocks up all year round.

crocheted stones

Imagine the gifts you can create with a few simple crochet stitches! How will you rock this project?


 
You can crochet stones for friends and family members and impress them with your creativity! Play around, experiment, and don’t forget to share photos of all the gorgeous décor you create!

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A few words about us

This article by Amber Bliss Calderón was originally published in an issue of Happily Hooked Crochet Magazine. If you aren’t a subscriber, you’re missing out! Visit our main website to learn more! The support in our Facebook group is phenomenal! There’s nothing like it anywhere else.
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Margaret Kavanagh

www.happilyhooked.com

I've been crocheting since my mother taught me as a little girl. I'm lucky to be working with Happily Hooked and I can't wait to share everything yarny and hooky with you! Yarn over, peeps! Yarn over!

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